Choctaw Code Talkers
 
Choctaw Code Talkers, a compelling documentary about
America’s World War I heroes, comes to public television in Fall 2010
 
Native American Public Telecommunications, Inc. (NAPT) proudly announces the release of a new documentary that examines the pivotal role that Choctaw soldiers played in helping shape an earlier end of World War I.
 
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This photo was taken upon returning to the United States from fighting in
WWI on June 7, 1919. Image courtesy of Stacy Mahoney.
 
In 1918, not yet citizens of the United States, Choctaw members of the
American Expeditionary Forces were asked by the government to use
their Native language as a powerful tool against the German Forces in World War I,
setting a precedent for code talking as an effective military weapon and
establishing them as America’s Original Code Talkers.
 
“The government had sworn them to secrecy about what they did,”
said Evangeline Wilson, relative of Code Talkers Mitchell Bobb
and James Edwards, Sr.
 
“By launching the original concept of code talking for secure military
communications, these brave Choctaw men laid the foundation for all
other battlefield code talkers, including the Navajo, who were so instrumental
in World War II. Even though it is overdue, nearly 100 years since their service,
I am honored to be a part of bringing this important American story to the screen,
” Red-Horse said.  (Note: Red-Horse is the producer of the documentary
that is to be released in the fall, 2010.) 
 
In World War I, by 1918, the German Forces had deciphered the Allied Forces’
radio codes, tapped into their phone lines and captured messenger runners
in order to anticipate the Allied strategies. The Allied Forces were desperate
to attain secure communications and requested Choctaw soldiers to use their
language to transmit messages in the field and from the trenches.
 
 “If you don’t have secure communications, it will end in stalemate or defeat,”
stated Matt Reed, Curator of the American Indian and Military History Collections
at the Oklahoma Museum of History.
 
“This is an important story of heroic men whose wartime contributions helped
to change the course of world history. Their Code was created while the men
risked their lives fighting in Northern France during the fiercest and bloodiest
battles of World War I. The Choctaw American Indian soldiers outwitted their
German opponents, turning the tide of the War and ensuring the Allied victory,” said Hurd.
 
If you hear the dates for the airing of this documentary, please let us know. 
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